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Low testosterone levels linked to diabetes

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Low levels of testosterone in men could increase their risk of developing diabetes.

University scientists have found that low testosterone levels are linked to a resistance to insulin, the hormone that controls blood sugar levels.

 

Low testosterone

The study is the first to directly show how low testosterone levels in fat tissue can be instrumental in the onset of Type 2 diabetes.

Testosterone is present throughout the body. Low testosterone levels are linked to obesity, a known risk factor for diabetes.

It acts on fat cells through molecules known as androgen receptors. These enable the testosterone to activate genes linked to obesity and diabetes.

Study

The research showed that mice in which the function of testosterone in fat tissue was impaired were more likely to be insulin resistant than mice in which the role of testosterone was not hindered.

As men age their testosterone levels lower. This, along with increasing obesity, will increase the incidence of diabetes.

The findings from the University of Edinburgh could also help explain why older men are more at risk of developing diabetes, because testosterone levels fall in men as they age.

It showed that mice, which did not have androgen receptors in fat tissue for testosterone to attach to, were more likely to show signs of insulin resistance than other mice.

Researchers found that mice without androgen receptors in fat tissue also became fatter than other mice and developed full insulin resistance when both types were fed a high-fat diet.

Key protein

Scientists believe that a protein called RBP4 plays a crucial role in regulating insulin resistance when testosterone is impaired.

They found that levels of RBP4 were higher in mice in which the role of testosterone was impaired.

The Edinburgh team say that its findings could lead to the development of new treatments that regulate production of RBP4.

This could reduce the risk of diabetes in men with lower levels of testosterone.

Further research

Researchers are now planning to study patients with Type-2 diabetes to see if their levels of testosterone correlate with levels of RBP 4.

(Source: University of Edinburgh)


More Information

Diabetes
For more information on diabetes, including different types of diabetes, blood glucose and dietary control, and long-term complications, as well as some useful videos, see Diabetes
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Dates

Posted On: 8 May, 2012
Modified On: 15 January, 2014

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